Daily Archives: Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

More Menander: Fragments in Quotations

Athenaeus quotes a character who is unhappily married telling a younger person not to marry: “of married men, not even one is saved”. This reminds me of the joke about the difference between a wedding and a funeral: in the … Continue reading

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Menander’s Perinthia (“The Girl from Perinthos”), Karchedonios (“The Man from Carthage”), Koneiazomenai (“The Women Drinking Hemlock”), and a Play without a Title

We’re down to, essentially, two and a half pages, including annotations for this play, now–that’s how fragmentary these plays are. Perinthia (or, “The Girl from Perinthos”) is mentioned, along with other Menander plays, by Terrence. In some cases Terrence took … Continue reading

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Menander’s Kolax (“The Flatterer”), Theophoroumene (“The Girl Possessed”), & Leukadia (“The Girl from Leukas”)

Menander’s fragmentary play Kolax (or, “The Flatterer”) had a courtesan (and thus no sexual assault of a “virtuous” girl–see the previous post for an explanation). The play is interesting because archaeological evidence has uncovered a mosaic scene that depicts a … Continue reading

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Menander’s Heros (“The Hero”), Kitharistes (“The Lyre-Player”), Georgos (“The Farmer”), & Phasma (“The Apparition”)

I just can’t let these four plays go without a comment–hence an entire blogpost for four very fragmentary plays. Like in Epitrepontes, the sexual forcing of a woman by a man who later marries her (without knowing she was his … Continue reading

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Menander’s Dis Exapaton (or, “Twice a Swindler”)

Menander’s play Dis Exapaton (or, “Twice a Swindler”) continues some of the motifs of his earlier plays, though with an emphasis on doubles. Where a courtesan was the hero of each of Samia and Epitrepontes, two courtesans are the sought-after … Continue reading

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